Employer Branding

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I’ll be in New York City sometime during the month of March. I’ll be attending The Human Capital Summit to talk about employer branding.

You know what I think about employer branding, right? I think that a company has a brand, a reputation, and a relationship with its consumers and employees. Those relationships are complex, multifaceted, and bigger than a splashy website and an overstated benefits package that offers you access to the company gym.

When I look for a job, I look for fiscal solvency. I review products and services. I don’t want to work for a company that manufactures poisonous toys for kids. I make sure the last couple of CEOs haven’t been perp walked on CNN. Then I look at the career website. I review the benefit page, the obligatory statement on culture, and the rest of the Human Resources propaganda. If it all adds up, and if I know some people who work for the company and aren’t miserable, I accept the interview.

To me, employer branding is much like consumer branding. A company is trying to override my free will with the goal of  selling me a flawed product — a job that will eventually break my heart and never pay me enough money.

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So I’ve been asked to come to NYC and talk about what employer branding means to my readers. Specifically, “What do you see in the marketplace?”

I know several fancy bloggers who focus on this area of expertise, and I’m good friends with many HR professionals who are charged with employer branding strategies in their organization. I don’t care about them.

What does employer branding mean to you? Does it mean anything? Does your HR department care about employer branding? Are you working in tandem with marketing to create an overarching strategy for your organization? As a job seeker, do you give a crap about employer branding? What are your priorities?

I would love your thoughts. I would like to speak to issues that impact the lives of real HR professionals, real job seekers, and the real employees who deal with this stuff on a daily basis.

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