#HRTechConf and HR Bloggers

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I am speaking about HR blogging at the 2010 HR Technology Conference & Expo.

I’m not sure if I can shed any light on social media and Human Resources. Can you? Haven’t we discussed this? I’m happy to weigh in and reaffirm the ideas that I’ve shared at countless other events.

  • HR bloggers are thinkers.
  • You want thinkers in your HR organization.
  • HR professionals who have something meaningful to say won’t be bloggers forever.
  • They will run businesses.
  • They will own budgets.
  • And they will remember if you didn’t take them seriously.

If you have anything else, please let me know.

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I am really grateful that HR Tech asked me to speak. It’s a fun conference, and the conference organizers are good to me. The people who attend are great. And at this point in my life, I don’t have the time to associate myself with mediocrity. Schwoo, I know you don’t have the time to read a lame blog about a horrible conference.

Unfortunately, other chumpy conference organizers are asking my fellow HR blogging colleagues to show up and perform like circus monkeys. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard, “I am giving you a pass. I won’t pay for your airfare and hotel, but I expect you to blog, tweet, and cover the sessions.”

I have news for these conference organizers. You can shove that free pass up your ass.

When I show up at an event, I show up. I bring an audience of HR leaders, executives, and buyers. I bring careerists and job seekers. I bring eyes. I bring an audience. I bring a voice. I am no diva, and I’ll come to an event for free if I know the conference organizer and value the work; however, most HR bloggers are not like me. They aren’t full-time writers and speakers. They are working professionals who have jobs, families, and children. Blogging for free and giving 100% in exchange for a conference pass isn’t an option.

And when naive corporate event planners treat bloggers like a cheap extension of a chintzy PR campaign, I get a little offended on behalf of my friends. Great writers. Great thinkers. Their work is worth something.

So I’m trying to set a new standard for the HR blogging community. You want access to my audience? Ask for it. You want excellent coverage for your event? Buy it like you would buy any item from a service provider. And if I ask a blogger to provide content for my company and attend an event on behalf of my organization, I will walk my talk and pay that person for his/her time.

I’m a capitalist, a blogger, and a Human Resources professional. I know that conferences operate on low margins; however, if you can pay $62 for a pot of coffee, you can rethink your social media and PR strategies and consider the importance of your relationships with working Human Resources professionals who take vacation days and personal days to cover your event and blog about it.

Cheapskates.

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